Tuesday’s Tribulations

It was 37 years ago today...Turning technology into tech knowledge since 1989.
Sgt. Pepper changed the world on this day 1967. Come together.

Marilyn Monroe (1926) and Brigham Young (1801) were born on this day.

  1. AMD announced several new chips at Computex in Taiwan today. The chips, based on Socket 939, include the Athlon 3500+ and 3800+ are clocked at 2.2 GHz and 2.4GHz repectively and carry 512 KByte of L2 cache and dual-channel memory controller. The new 64-bit Athlon FX-53 processor, clocked at 2.4 GHz, continues to ship with one megabyte of L2 cache. All three chips have AMD’s NX technology, which when used in conjunction with Windows XP SP-2, prevents buffer overflow attacks by limiting access to memory.
  2. China is clamping down on online games. The government has established a censorship committee to review existing online games. Publishers must get approval from the Ministry of Culture before selling any new games in China.
  3. Good news for Vonage and the cell phone companies. Verizon has been letting customers keep DSL access even when they cancel telephone service. Naked DSL (yes that’s what they call it) from Verizon is $34.95/month.
  4. Time-Warner CEO Richard Parsons says its important that some “Internet fairy dust gets sprinkled on AOL.” America Online has been losing members – 2.2 million last year – to broadband, but Parsons hasn’t given up on the online service. “Our challenge is to articulate to Wall Street that there is a Yahoo inside AOL.” AOL launches a new broadband ad campaign today. Time-Warner’s stock price has tumbled from $57 three years ago to $17 today, chiefly on concerns about the future of AOL.
  5. Robert X. Cringley has a great article about hacking the Linksys 802.11g Wireless Access Point to turn it into a complete WISP solution. Slashdot notes similar projects like EWRT and Wi-Fi Box.

23 Replies to “Tuesday’s Tribulations”

  1. just noting that come together was not on the album sgt. pepper’s lonley hearts club band. in fact it was introduced on abbey road in 1968.

  2. i went to google and typed in robert cringley. they asked me if i meant robert cringely. the answer was yes.

  3. Leo — Most likely a simple typo — but ya might want to fix that to 802.11g on the Linksys topic 😉
    VERY NICE on the AMD announcments. AMD continues to impress me with their leaps and bounds in the chip / microprocessor industry. I’ll be looking forward to picking one of those up myself!
    Man, that’s a bold step by Verizon — but I know I only own a cell phone and don’t have phone service and I know many people with same thoughts on the matter. I have cable internet, but that’s just a nice option out there for people like me who would rather not pay the extra $ / month in a land-line bill as well. And Vonage is just awesome. I may consider signing up with them, if nothing else for the convienience of it. Take your phone line anywhere with you… great concept! Bad news for the Baby Bells… let’s hear a collective “awwwww” for them… hehe, not a chance!

  4. In reference to your last post, you need to get DeBartolo to draw a few pages on the final days of TechTV. Remember that guy a few years ago the wrote the fan art using screen caps. As I recall you were a villain out for world domination. That guy was talented, hope someone hired him.

  5. That’s really good news about DSL! I’m looking to dump my cable company and get Satellite TV, but didn’t want to have to have cable internet access. I’ve been looking into Vonage for my business account, so this may be what I need to move on!
    Brian Sakowicz
    http://www.briansakowiczdesign.com/

  6. WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Veddy Proper, ok so my lame try at typing in a “Brit” Accent. 🙂
    That flash is just un-real! really has a touch of “Yellow Submarine” and the feel of a beatles work.

  7. YEA, good news on the AMD processors. I have always been a supporter of AMD since it’s K6-2 days.
    Let’s hope they continue to develop and survive. It pushes the envelope that bit further for price and performance. Intel has really had to respond. Without them, Intel would have steamrolled the consumers into buying Pentium 3,4,5,6 or whatever nonsense they created. And now to break away from the processor speed chase since realizing that AMD was right to point out the megahertz/gigahertz has got little importance in overall PC performance is now changing the names of future processors? Yawn. And how original is that? Drawing much of its codenames from BMWs. 3 series, 5 series… 7 series… yawn.. bla bla bla
    http://read-my.blogspot.com

  8. Even with broadband, AOL is still suck… Slow connection speeds, frequent crashes, and its mail program only filters out about half of the spam.

  9. I can’t believe the people in China aren’t fed up with the geovernment deciding what games, news, etc they are allowed to have. I can only hope the US will continue to have common sense when it comes to allowing its citizens to decide for themselves the content they can receive.

  10. I curious about this leoville.tv project (as mentioned on the tv section of the site). I went to the URL and there was nothing there. But I suppose not presenting anything until you’re ready instead of putting something up that’s only halfway done and mostly doesn’t work *ahem…G4techtv.com…ahem* is better.

  11. Vulcans are defined as VULTURES, and the definition is most fitting (Vulcan/Vultures).
    G4 is defined as a synonym/acronym “Good four” Nothing, Know Nothing, also very fitting, TO SAY THE LEAST> LEO….get a job as a TV host soon, we ALL miss you for sure. Those jerks really screwed up TechTV in a Hurry.
    Gene Brown, Delray Beach, Florida, agenohb@hotmail.com

  12. There is no other choice than to move on from the demise of TechTV. Even if you’re a former employee that has lost a job, this ranting and bitterness will not help you. Vulcan did what they had to do. If they were not going to support the channel, they needed to drop it. Paul Allen had the same exuberance about tech as most people did in the late 90’s. He envisioned a platform to preach tech to the world. After the tech crash I think he lost interest, and his bean counters wanted to dump this non-profitable investment. TechTV never recovered from that all day Techlive crap. Even those involved knew it was a big mistake. By the time they got the thing on the air the dot-com boom was over. They took a nice little cable access channel and tried to compete with MSNBC, Reuters, and CNN. Over ambition is what killed TechTV. Some may say Paul Allen has allusions of grandeur, but he’s a billionaire and can afford it.

  13. There is no other choice than to move on from the demise of TechTV. Even if you’re a former employee that has lost a job, this ranting and bitterness will not help you. Vulcan did what they had to do. If they were not going to support the channel, they needed to drop it. Paul Allen had the same exuberance about tech as most people did in the late 90’s. He envisioned a platform to preach tech to the world. After the tech crash I think he lost interest, and his bean counters wanted to dump this non-profitable investment. TechTV never recovered from that all day Techlive crap. Even those involved knew it was a big mistake. By the time they got the thing on the air the dot-com boom was over. They took a nice little cable access channel and tried to compete with MSNBC, Reuters, and CNN. Over ambition is what killed TechTV. Some may say Paul Allen has illusions of grandeur, but he’s a billionaire and can afford it.

  14. I would have to disagree with the comment about AOL. People complaining about AOL’s service and connection are either a) living in areas where *ANY* ISP’s dialup would be affected, or b) stuck in the past and are just riding the bandwagon that has long left the station.
    Without doing *anything* the Spam filters on AOL filter out at least 60% of spam coming in (though you might get more if you routinely sign up for things and click where you shouldn’t on the ineternet — how most people end up on spam lists to begin with).
    But the mistake people make now is they don’t use the REPORT SPAM button to enable their spam filters to get smarter. It’s the same as how personal firewall software makes you “teach” it what you want to allow to access the internet. Without that teaching, the firewall is useless. Well… as are spam filters – for ANY ISP. Not just AOL.
    Also — there is no reason a broadband connection would make AOL a slow connection. AOL has always been fast over a TCP/IP connection, even before home users had broadband — when it was only corporate settings that had high speed internet.
    If you are going to criticize something, do your research – don’t just go by what you hear or read on the internet or from other “know-nothings”.

  15. I lived with AOL’s CompuServe service for three years thanks to a rebate commitment, and lived with AOL free for one year, taking advantage of a free subscription offer that came with a replacement computer. I hated them both, they were plagued with unexplained disconnects in this area. Access email, CompuServe/AoL would sometimes freeze. I quickly knew what would happen within under 60 seconds…”Your Connection With CompuServe (AOL) Has Been Lost.” Access newsgroups, same thing would happen at times, same results.
    Respond to an email with a reply that took awhile…in the middle of the email, a “You’ve been idle for awhile, do you wish to remain online?” message would appear.
    I dumped AOL after the one year trial, and counted down the months when my three year commitment to CompuServe would be over. I’ve been a very happy Earthlink subscriber for almost two years, it’s head/shoulders superior to the service I received from either CompuServe or AOL.
    Even worse–AOL, in its current zeal to supposedly protect its members from spam, is now censoring emails if they contain any reference to a URL that the almighty AOL has considered to be hazardous to its members’ health. I found this out when an AOL friend of mine sent me an email that contained a URL to a site that offers downloads for programs such as “Fresh UI” and “Fresh Download.” Hardly an evil site, but I responded to him with his original email in quotes. AOL bounced the email back to me because of the URL that was in his quoted response, claiming that they had received complaints from members about this site. I don’t need or want an ISP that engages in activity of this nature.

  16. I will totally agree on CompuServe. CompuServe, Prodigy, etc. They all were terrible. And again, your comments take you back to the days when AOL’s subscriber base was growing too fast for its dialup modem farms. That was the sole reason for the common complaints against AOL… not for any reason other than they oversold themselves in the market and couldn’t meet the demand.
    Broadband has actually helped them out there, because now they can free up more lines for people in places where broadband is next to impossible to get. The only problem for them now is exactly what the article posted states — that subscribers with broadband are leaving because technically speaking, you don’t need AOL if you have broadband.
    The one thing that is nice (and I know Earthlink does it and some broadband providers have started recently as well) is to have the dialup minutes for use when traveling away from your broadband connection. This is a major factor for business persons and families who travel a fair amount of time over the course of the year. And many broadband ISP’s charge for the dialup access — even though they claim it’s included with the broadband account.
    As far as emails.. I’ve never once had an email bounced back and I send email to friends using AOL as well as back and forth from myself. As easy as it is to configure, most people on AOL still do not set up their email filters correctly — and *that* I have seen cause emails to be bounced back or rejected.
    However, now even with those filters email from “non accepted” email addresses just gets put in Spam/Junk folder… not rejected. I’ve gotten several emails from “untrusted” sources in my blocked list that show up in the Spam/Junk folder, they weren’t rejected at all…even though I had my account set to block email from anyone not on my list.
    I’d suspect the email your friend forwarded didn’t actually come from AOL. Ask your friend next time to verify that the email had a BLUE mail icon next to it — that’d be the only emails actually sent from AOL. The latest worms out there spoof ISP admin/support email addresses and try to lure unsuspectng individuals to bite on links inside the emails — good links or bad.

  17. The bounceback of the email to my friend actually came from AOL…they’re scanning emails for URLs and rejecting ones that are on a blacklist.
    I receive Fred Langa’s Langalist newsletter twice a week. Shortly after I had this experience, he ran into the same problem with copies of his newsletter that were sent to AOL subscribers. Every one was rejected/returned because the newsletter contained a URL that was on AOL’s blacklist.
    This experience can be read in greater detail at:
    http://www.justaddbrains.com/viewtopic.php?t=4845

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