Monday’s Tech Tidbits

The hardest working man in show businessA new week with new news.
America’s first passenger flight occurred on this day in 1919, flying from New York to Atlantic City. Four years later the first intercontinental non-stop flew from New York to San Diego. In 1965 the Today Show is broadcast from Early Bird, marking the first use of satellite TV.

Happy 76th Birthday to the Godfather of Soul, James Brown.

  1. Sasser sucks. The Sasser worm which emerged Friday spreads over networks by taking advantage of a security hole in Windows, but it’s so poorly written that it’s barely spreading at all. At least so far – but it’s early in the week yet. Microsoft has patched the flaw in the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) that allows the worm in – it’s hotfix 835732. If you’re up-to-date with Windows Update, or you’re using a firewall or broadband router, you’re safe.

  2. eEye Digital Security – the same folks who discovered Sasser, have found a flaw in Apple’s Quicktime player that could allow a trojan horse to attack Mac OS X. A malformed .MOV file could allow a hacker to execute code on your system. No exploits have been seen and Apple pushed a patch through its System Update on Friday.
  3. Well that’s a relief. SCO has backed off its claims that Linux is unconstitutional. I had no idea our founding fathers knew about the GPL.
  4. Wal-Mart has announced it will use RFID tags throughout its stores, but California State Senator, Debra Bowen of Redondo Beach (who is increasingly taking the lead on these tech issues), has offered a state bill setting privacy standards for RFID devices in stores and libraries. The bill, which bans the use of RFID to track people as they shop or after they leave the store, passed the State Senate on Thursday. It will be heard next month in the State Assembly.

11 Replies to “Monday’s Tech Tidbits”

  1. As if the current inventory control systems at Wal-Mart (also known as work) weren’t enough of a hassle. I can’t wait to see how the rollout and initial implementation goes!

  2. You know, this worm didnt do ANY thing malicious, apart from making my life hell by worrying and slowing down the computer….whats the point of making it might i ask?

  3. I actually had to inform the tech in our building of the new virus.. She hadn’t seen the MS release on it yet (and I think at least one of our computers is infected)
    -A

  4. Poorly written? I got it on friday…had no idea what was happening, was about to reformat windows. Now banish sasser!
    THANKS ALOT LEO

  5. Hello leo, big fan. I’m from Trinidad. I am going to join the forum. Do you talk back to peopel here? I am getting the blue screen too. Does this mean no more TTV? Thank you. P.S. I Hve No School Today!

  6. I work as a Tech Support Internal Helpdesk Agent for the Evil Empire’s ISP. Yup, the one with a butterfly. Our agents are now all overworked because of the Sasser virus. We have around a hundred customers on queue waiting for technical support. I’d say this virus has spread quite a bit. Were on day 3 of this Sasser virus infestation but already it brings back memories of the Blaster worm. I’d say this is one nasty virus.

  7. Wal-Mart, among others, plans to use RFID for inventory control. Tagging gives them the opportunity to track the location of an item from the time it is received in a warehouse until it’s sold. Of course, one aspect of Inventory Control is loss prevention. RFID taga that are not deactivated before a product leaves a store could be evidence of theft, assuming that tags would be deactivated at the register when an item is purchased.
    Many food retailers already track customers’ buying habits through the use of store credit cards, shopping discount cards and check approval cards, without the shopper’s knowledge. Big brother is already here.

  8. What’s the point of releasing a virus? You need to profile the creator/releaser. Disenfranchised, angry, naive kids that needs to prove they have worth and ability in something. Bragging rights in a closed community. There is just as much blame for running these unpatched naked systems, and the hole ridden bloated codes as the script kiddies. This is a poorly written virus attacking old exploits. Wait until the smart ones hit. The one that will come from the 16 year old that dreams in machine code and has a real political agenda. He’s out there right now, the cyber-terrorist.

  9. *quote*
    assuming that tags would be deactivated at the register when an item is purchased.
    Many food retailers already track customers’ buying habits through the use of store credit cards, shopping discount cards and check approval cards, without the shopper’s knowledge. Big brother is already here.
    ********
    That’s assuming they deactivate them. From what I understand, they are “passive” devices, meaning they only broadcast while in the presence of a device designed to read them. They do not broadcast continually, much like those pet ID chips you can get for your dog or cat.
    However… while what you state about food retailers tracking buying habits may be true, I highly doubt I will ever have a personally-identifiable box of corn flakes in my cupboard.
    I don’ shop at WallyWorld, so I’m not all that concerned about it. I guess I don’t have a problem with it at all as long as the devices are able to be deactivated or easily removed by the consumer. If these things start getting embedded in clothing or personal-use items, then I’d have a real serious problem with it.

  10. Put the RFIDs in a microwave for interesting results….
    Ok, i dont run a firewall, and hence i got the worm. Surely those in huge companies must run some sort of firewall, be it hardware or software.

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